50 migrants killed in clash with security at Polish border

A protest against Britain’s planned withdrawal from the European Union has turned violent in the Polish town of Lidzbieta, as hundreds of migrants attempt to cross the border into Poland, according to Polish media…

50 migrants killed in clash with security at Polish border

A protest against Britain’s planned withdrawal from the European Union has turned violent in the Polish town of Lidzbieta, as hundreds of migrants attempt to cross the border into Poland, according to Polish media reports. Three migrants have been killed in the conflict so far. The Polish government is reluctant to cross the Lidzbieta border due to President Andrzej Duda’s meetings this week with the presidents of Germany and France and Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany, all of whom are talking tough and seeking ways to manage the flow of migrants and refugees arriving in Europe.

The Polish government wants to turn back at least a million migrants and refugees who have entered Europe on their way to countries like Germany, according to Reuters. They’ve tried and largely failed to integrate these newcomers. The EU is all but powerless to stop them because its borders are effectively sealed and these refugees — mostly Syrians, Iraqis and Eritreans — are now more difficult to turn back than even migrants who cross irregularly.

The European Union is also struggling to find the right way to handle the influx of migrants in a way that does not pose a further threat to an entire continent. It is still working to create a common stance in the European Parliament to deal with the matter, and little has come of it.

Andrzej Duda has come under criticism from the public in Poland, and party leaders who want to increase the numbers of migrants to the country. The Polish president said he should have taken better care of the migrants, and was sometimes looking for them in the woods. The best place to leave migrants is in their native countries of origin.

Last week, right-wing populism took another step forward in some neighboring countries as well, when populist leaders in Hungary, the Czech Republic and Poland could do little to stop an attempt by migrants to cross their borders into Ukraine, according to The New York Times.

Read the full story at The Times.

Related

Polish President Andrzej Duda reaches out to Poland’s Jews in emotional encounter

German official: German troops won’t be deterred from building fences along Polish border

Leave a Comment