Report: New Climate Change Study Touts Little Progress, Points to Danger of “Extraordinary” Atmospheric Warming

A new report from the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) calls for mitigating global warming this century, but points out that there’s been little progress to be made to reach that goal….

Report: New Climate Change Study Touts Little Progress, Points to Danger of "Extraordinary" Atmospheric Warming

A new report from the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) calls for mitigating global warming this century, but points out that there’s been little progress to be made to reach that goal.

There have been calls for keeping the rise in global temperature to 1.5-2 degrees Celsius. This was also recommended in the 2015 report by the U.N.’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

The IPCC report confirms the scientific research that suggests that the world needs to reduce greenhouse gas emissions drastically, but acknowledges that not enough is being done.

For example, the report states that we have a 58 percent chance of exceeding the 1.5 degree Celsius target, as the estimates vary from just over half a degree Celsius up to almost two degrees Celsius.

1.5 degrees Celsius tops off the combined worldwide temperature increase over the period that climate models project.

And if there is no climate change, there would be an 11 percent chance of exceeding the 2 degrees Celsius mark.

Scientific research shows that the warming trend will continue and there is a certainty that the mean global surface temperature will continue to increase between 1.5 and 2 degrees Celsius over the next 45 years.

The report also warns that if every individual country within the United Nations Climate Change Panel is equal in their contributions, then the globe will still be warmer in 2100 than in 1850.

It also projects that global mean surface temperatures will increase by 3.7 degrees Celsius over the past 1000 years, with effects including much higher sea levels, more extreme weather events, massive droughts, growing food shortfalls and a range of other extreme weather events.

Additionally, extreme droughts have exacerbated migration, and dangerous events like drought or flooding may lead to large-scale crop failures and food crises.

Numerous weather events continue to threaten low-lying islands and coastal regions, with the risk of heatwaves, cyclones, hurricanes and other extreme weather events projected to become more severe.

The report also says that as a result of global warming, a variety of human rights, such as the right to food, will be negatively affected.

The report says that global warming might increase the vulnerability to droughts, major events such as flooding, hurricane intensity and displacement among other conditions.

“Because of the time needed to forecast climatic conditions with any high degree of accuracy, the ‘medium uncertainty’ [in IPCC climate estimates] is considerable,” the report says.

According to the report, there is still an estimated 11.2 degree Celsius rise in future sea level increase.

The IPCC estimates that by 2100, the world will be hotter than the average temperature of 117 degrees Celsius, or 284 degrees Fahrenheit, which is what our current global average temperature is now.

The researchers at IPCC suggest that the world needs a drastic change in policies on energy, transportation, buildings, infrastructure and urban planning by 2030.

Using natural gas, coal, biofuels and hydrocarbons are among the solutions that must be considered.

– Markos Kaplakos is an associate news director for World News America. Follow him on Twitter @Markoskaplakos.

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