Trump and Nieto in June? Six things to watch

By Debra Goldschmidt, CNN • Updated 29th April 2016 Designed by Zaha Hadid Architects This summit will bring together President Trump and President Enrique Peña Nieto of Mexico in June. Here’s what to look…

Trump and Nieto in June? Six things to watch

By Debra Goldschmidt, CNN • Updated 29th April 2016

Designed by Zaha Hadid Architects

This summit will bring together President Trump and President Enrique Peña Nieto of Mexico in June. Here’s what to look out for

The visit comes a week after the two leaders met in Washington. Since then, Trump has sent mixed signals regarding the highly symbolic trade summit. While he is committed to maintaining the border, his plans for Mexico remain unclear.

Will he work with Mexico to negotiate a new relationship, or will he impose new measures on the country?

Peña Nieto’s government has announced a big celebration in May to mark the meeting’s 100th anniversary.

“The United States of America and Mexico are tied together in the highest level of reciprocity. And our bilateral relationship goes beyond economic interdependence,” he said in a pre-announcement communique on April 5.

“Our people are united across this border in extraordinary ways,” the statement added.

And here’s what we know about what’s on the table during the summit.

The theme

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton called it a regional “summit of the Americas”

“It’s going to be an opportunity for me to lay out a vision for how we can build better partnerships for the benefit of the continent and the hemisphere,” President Peña Nieto said

He’ll also lay out his plans for bilateral relations with Washington.

“What is happening on both sides of the border is that the historical negative feelings that people had about each other are going to go away.” he said at the White House on April 12.

Trump’s plans

Trump’s push for border wall

Details on the border wall project remain vague, but Trump promised it would be funded by Mexico. He has said it “will come out in the wash” but several sources have suggested it will cost up to $21.6 billion

The toll on Mexico is also unclear.

“Both sides need to be open to compromise, to work through things on a bilateral basis,” Trump said at the White House on April 12.

“We will solve big problems, big issues, and we will find a way to have a great relationship with Mexico in the future.”

Trump’s desire to trade with countries he deems “fair”

Trump said “we may have to lose some and may have to do some more trade with other countries but it’s going to be done in a fair way with other countries.”

On the one hand, his plans to make the country “great” won’t damage relations with Mexico.

On the other hand, any tariffs to Mexico will mean greater expense for Mexicans.

North American Aerospace Defense Command in Area 51

While no formal announcement has been made on the topic, a source familiar with the decision said it’s “on the table.”

Trump expressed his desire for the site to be preserved during a rally in Arizona in March.

“We’re going to secure it and keep it secure and they can protect it as best they can and I’ll make it very clear to them. If they think that’s a great site for a foreign power, we have a problem,” he said.

Will there be any progress on trade agreements?

Trump has been proposing a continental trade deal that would eliminate the North American Free Trade Agreement, or NAFTA.

NAFTA, signed in 1994, has been a hallmark of Mexico’s prosperity since then-President George H.W. Bush came to power that year.

Trump says he wants to replace NAFTA with a new deal. Both countries say they need more time to analyze the terms.

As far as NAFTA is concerned, trade between the United States and Mexico is far below par. The United States exported more to Europe than it did to Mexico last year, according to the Commerce Department.

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