Globally, we’re more comfortable with male therapists

Ten out of every 100 British police officers surveyed by the BBC last year said that the use of powers such as stop and search had made them feel uncomfortable – a higher rate…

Globally, we're more comfortable with male therapists

Ten out of every 100 British police officers surveyed by the BBC last year said that the use of powers such as stop and search had made them feel uncomfortable – a higher rate than any other member of the public.

In addition, nearly one in five officers surveyed said that their use of stop and search powers had had an impact on their relationships with their neighbours or neighbours’ children.

However, this is far less common than allegations of domestic abuse of women by men.

In September 2017, an inquiry concluded that violent street sex attacks by five officers in a Walsall police station had happened as a result of a dysfunctional culture where officers allowed crude or humiliating forms of sexual harassment to go unchecked or encouraged.

One off-duty officer, Richard Johnson, photographed the woman making him breakfast, sending images to friends and drawing up a list of degrading sexual details about her. He was found guilty of 13 charges including “photographing a sex act” and “insulting a female victim” after a separate case.

Two officers were given suspended sentences while three got bans and the force apologized to the woman.

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